Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Resurrection Sunday’

Passover (Pesach) is one of three major feasts in the Jewish calendar. The first Passover occurred while the Jews were still slaves in Egypt.

Beginning in Exodus 12:3 and following, God instructs the people, “on the tenth day of this month every man shall take for himself a lamb, according to the house of his father, a lamb for a household. . . . Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male of the first year. You may take it from the sheep or from the goats. Now you shall keep it until the fourteenth day of the same month. Then the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it at twilight.And they shall take some of the blood and put it on the two doorposts and on the lintel of the houses where they eat it. Then they shall eat the flesh on that night; roasted in fire, with unleavened bread and with bitter herbs they shall eat it. Do not eat it raw, nor boiled at all with water, but roasted in fire-its head with its legs and its entrails. You shall let none of it remain until morning, and what remains of it until morning you shall burn with fire. And thus you shall eat it: with a belt on your waist, your sandals on your feet, and your staff in your hand. So you shall eat it in haste. It is the LORD’S Passover.”

In Exodus 12:12 and following, God gives the reason for the Passover, “for I will pass through the land of Egypt on that night, and will strike all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast; and against all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgment: I am the LORD. Now the blood shall be a sign for you on the houses where you are. And when I see the blood, I will pass over you; and the plague shall not be on you to destroy you when I strike the land of Egypt.”

Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy all mention the Passover as do many books of the history of the Jews.

What does this have to do with Jesus?

  • Jesus was a Jew.
  • Jesus was celebrating Passover with his disciples on the night he was betrayed
  • By the blood of the lamb being smeared on the lintel and doorposts of the houses of the Jews, the judgment of God passed over them on that first Passover in Egypt. Similarly, by the blood of Jesus, the wrath of God passes over those who believe Jesus died for their sins.
  • Jesus converted the symbols of Passover (cup of redemption) and the unleavened bread into symbols of the new covenant – what we know as communion.

Throughout Jewish history, the Passover celebration was pointing forward – to the Lamb of God who would take away the sins of the world and cause the wrath of God to pass over the children of God.

Who are these who have been passed over? Those who believe that Christ is the Son of God and that His death was a substitutionary death – Jesus because the substitute sacrifice – the lamb to be slain.

It’s Your Blood that cleanses me
It’s Your Blood that gives me life
It’s Your Blood that took my place
In redeeming sacrifice, Washes me,
Whiter than the snow, than the snow
My Jesus, God’s precious sacrifice.

1031952-file_passionmovie_oncross2

Read Full Post »

Some biblical concepts are easier to understand than others. Redemption may be one of the easier ones. To redeem something means to buy it back.

Imagine you are short on funds for your rent payment. The landlord is threatening to evict you if you don’t pay by the close of business. How do you get money quick? You might consider pawning your Fender guitar – not because you want to sell it, but because it has value and the pawn shop owner might give you enough cash to make your rent. When you get paid at the end of the week, you might head back to the pawn shop to redeem – or buy back – your guitar.

  • What does this have to do with Jesus?
  • Who is being redeemed?
  • From what?
  • How?

The Bible teaches us that Jesus is the redeemer. (See Galatians 3:13; Titus 2:14, Hebrews 9:12)

We are the redeemed – some of us. The redemption is not limited to any particular group of people. The redeemed come from every tribe and tongue and people and nation. Revelation 5:9)

The redemption Jesus Christ offers is redemption from the curse of the law (Galatians 3:13), from every lawless deed (Titus 2:14) and from  power of the grave (Psalm 49:15)

It is by Jesus’ own blood that He redeemed us, purchased us back from the ruler of this world (Satan). (See Hebrews 9:12, Revelations 5:9)

The best news is that this redemption Christ has accomplished for me – for you – is eternal (it has no end).

pieces of silver

Read Full Post »

In this series of posts on the vocabulary of the resurrection and surrounding events, today we consider redemption.

Here’s your assignment:

  1. Consider the dictionary definition of the words redeem and redemption.
  2. Consider the following verses and what they add to your understanding of redemption:
  • Psalm 49:8, 15
  • Lamentations 3:58
  • Galatians 3:13
  • Titus 2:14
  • Hebrews 9:12
  • Revelation 5:9

lamb

Read Full Post »

For this Christian (and I hope it is the same for others), words and the proper use and understanding of terms is key to the discussion of issues of faith, belief and the Bible. With that in mind, before I begin my series of studies in preparation and leading up to Resurrection Sunday, I want to look at some of the vocabulary that is central to the events and their implications for believers and non-believers.

For this post, I want to start with the word ATONEMENT.

I will share some of the insights I have in tomorrow’s post, but in preparation for that, here is your assignment:

  1. What is the dictionary definition of atonement? Consider looking in a traditional dictionary as well as a Bible dictionary. You might also consider an online resource like http://www.dictionary.com.
  2. Consider Leviticus 17:11. What does it add to your understanding?

nothing but the blood

Read Full Post »

As promised, here’s some of what I found and thought on the issue of atonement:

Paul E. Little in Know What You Believe says “atonement means, “at-one-ment”–that is to say, a bringing together of those who are estranged.” He concedes that in the Old Testament, atonement referred more to a covering. The covering for sin provided under the sacrificial system would suffice until the death of Christ. In the New Testament, Little says that atonement encompasses several ideas, namely reconciliation (as mentioned in Romans 5:10), and appeasement or propitiation–“the removal of wrath by the offering of a gift.” (See Romans 3:25).

According to Grudem in his Systematic Theology, two aspects of the character of God are at work in the atonement: His love and His justice. The love we see explained in John 3:16 and the justice we find in verses such as Romans 3:25. Grudem says, “the love and the justice of God were the ultimate cause of the atonement. . . . without the love of God, he would never have taken any steps to redeem us, yet without the justice of God, the specific requirement that Christ should earn our salvation by dying for our sins would not have been met. Both the love and the justice of God were equally important.”

For me, atonement brings to mind imagery of the Old Testament, blood filling the Kidron Valley at Passover and other high holidays as it flowed from the Temple, from the sacrifices killed one after the other on the bronze altar in the court yard–the blood flowed out of the animal and met the sin of the offeror. God had established the blood as a means to cover the offeror’s sin. It was His law.

So it was with Jesus, with His blood on the cross. His blood met my sin–it satisfied the debt my sin represented in the economy of God. It was a permanent solution to my sin problem.

 

Perhaps a hymn by William Cowper can best express the idea:

There is a fountain filled with blood 
Drawn from Immanuel’s veins,
And sinners plunged beneath that flood
Lose all their guilty stains

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts