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Archive for the ‘hymns’ Category

by William H. Bathurst, 1796-1877

O for a faith that will not shrink
Though pressed by ev’ry foe,
That will not tremble on the brink
Of any earthly woe.

That will not murmur nor complain
Beneath the chast’ning rod,
But in the hour of grief or pain
Will lean upon its God.

A faith that shines more bright and clean
When tempests rage without,
That, when in danger, knows no fear,
In darkness feels no doubt.

Lord, give me such a faith as this,
And then, whate’er may come,
I’ll take e’en now the hallowed bliss
Of an eternal home.

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Do you want a Pilot?
Signal then to Jesus;
Do you want a Pilot?
Bid Him come on board;
For He will safely guide
Across the oceans wide
Until you reach at last
The Heavenly Harbour.

-Children’s Sunday School Song (origin unknown)

 

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The glorious thing about the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus the Christ is that it continues to speak in our hearts. Even today, modern hymn writers are still penning lyrics of the glory of the resurrection and our hope in Christ alone.

My favorite part of this song is “There in the ground His body lay, Light of the world by darkness slain; Then bursting forth in glorious day, up from the grave He rose again!
And as He stands in victory, Sin’s curse has lost its grip on me.” When I sing it, I am reminded of the glory of God and His great power over death.

CHORUS:
In Christ alone my hope is found;
He is my light, my strength, my song;
This cornerstone, this solid ground,
Firm through the fiercest drought and storm.
What heights of love, what depths of peace,
When fears are stilled, when strivings cease!
My comforter, my all in all—
Here in the love of Christ I stand.

In Christ alone, Who took on flesh,
Fullness of God in helpless babe!
This gift of love and righteousness,
Scorned by the ones He came to save.
Till on that cross as Jesus died,
The wrath of God was satisfied;
For ev’ry sin on Him was laid—
Here in the death of Christ I live.

There in the ground His body lay,
Light of the world by darkness slain;
Then bursting forth in glorious day,
Up from the grave He rose again!
And as He stands in victory,
Sin’s curse has lost its grip on me;
For I am His and He is mine—
Bought with the precious blood of Christ.

No guilt in life, no fear in death—
This is the pow’r of Christ in me;
From life’s first cry to final breath,
Jesus commands my destiny.
No pow’r of hell, no scheme of man,
Can ever pluck me from His hand;
Till He returns or calls me home—
Here in the pow’r of Christ I’ll stand.

Words by Stuart Townend (1963-   )

If you are looking for additional information and/or materials, please visit our website at RootedinHisWord.org and our Facebook page.  We are currently offering a special on our bible study, Road to Resurrection, which helps the student to delve into the events which took place leading up to and on the Day of Resurrection.

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Go to Dark Gethsemene

In this hymn by James Montgomery, a prolific hymn writer having written over 400 hymns, we go on a journey. We start in the Garden of Gethsemane and Jesus teaches us to ray. Then we go to His trials and learn to bear the cross. Then we go to Calvary and learn to die as Christ did. Finally, we go to the tomb, and Jesus teaches us to rise. It is very simple, and yet profound.

My favorite stanza is, “Early hasten to the tomb where they laid his breathless clay; all is solitude and gloom. Who has taken him away? Christ is risen! He meets our eyes; Savior, teach us so to rise.”

  • Go to dark Gethsemane, ye that feel the tempter’s power; your Redeemer’s conflict see, watch with him one bitter hour. Turn not from his griefs away; learn of Jesus Christ to pray.
  • See him at the judgment hall, beaten, bound, reviled, arraigned; O the wormwood and the gall! O the pangs his soul sustained! Shun not suffering, shame, or loss; learn of Christ to bear the cross.
  • Calvary’s mournful mountain climb; there, adoring at his feet, mark that miracle of time, God’s own sacrifice complete. “It is finished!” hear him cry; learn of Jesus Christ to die.
  • Early hasten to the tomb where they laid his breathless clay; all is solitude and gloom. Who has taken him away? Christ is risen! He meets our eyes; Savior, teach us so to rise.

James Montgomery (1771-1854)

If you are looking for additional information and/or materials, please visit our website at RootedinHisWord.org and our Facebook page. We are currently offering a special on our bible study, Road to Resurrection, which helps the student to delve into the events which took place leading up to and on the Day of Resurrection.

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I like the imagery of this hymn by Jeannette Threlfall. It conjures up the Palm Sunday Road in Jerusalem that meanders down the Mount of Olives to the Garden of Gethsemane. It’s a great place to imagine the events this hymn celebrates, namely the crowd shouting “Hosanna in the Highest!” to Jesus as made his triumphal entry into Jerusalem on the foal of a donkey.

Hosanna, loud hosanna
the little children sang;
through pillared court and temple
the lovely anthem rang.
To Jesus, who had blessed them,
close folded to his breast,
the children sang their praises,
the simplest and the best.

From Olivet they followed
mid an exultant crowd,
the victory palm branch waving,
and chanting clear and loud.
The Lord of earth and heaven
rode on in lowly state,
nor scorned that little children
should on his bidding wait.

“Hosanna in the highest!”
That ancient song we sing,
for Christ is our Redeemer,
the Lord of heaven, our King.
O may we ever praise him
with heart and life and voice,
and in his blissful presence
eternally rejoice.

Jeannette Threlfall (1821-1880)

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Palm Sunday Road, Jerusalem

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Pilgrims walking down the Palm Sunday Road

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Pilgrims walking down the Palm Sunday Road

If you are looking for additional information and/or materials, please visit our website at RootedinHisWord.org and our Facebook page. We are currently offering a special on our bible study, Road to Resurrection, which helps the student to delve into the events which took place leading up to and on the Day of Resurrection.

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Bernard of Clairvaux, the writer to whom this hymn is attributed, lived from (1091-1153 A.D.) He was a hugely influential Christian in the Middle Ages and a devout monk. The images he uses in the hymn are reminiscent of the suffering Messiah of Isaiah 53.

I love the  the intimacy Bernard has with his Savior. “How pale thou art with anguish, with sore abuse and scorn! How does that visage language which once was bright as morn!” It seems hard to believe that he wrote these words so long ago because they pierce to my heart as I read and sing them.

O sacred Head, now wounded,
With grief and shame weighed down,
Now scornfully surrounded
With thorns, thine only crown:
How pale thou art with anguish,
With sore abuse and scorn!
How does that visage languish
Which once was bright as morn!

What thou, my Lord, has suffered
Was all for sinners’ gain;
Mine, mine was the transgression,
But thine the deadly pain.
Lo, here I fall, my Savior!
‘Tis I deserve thy place;
Look on me with thy favor,
Vouchsafe to me thy grace.

What language shall I borrow
To thank thee, dearest friend,
For this thy dying sorrow,
Thy pity without end?
O make me thine forever;
And should I fainting be,
Lord, let me never, never
Outlive my love for thee.

If you are looking for additional information and/or materials, please visit our website at RootedinHisWord.org and our Facebook page. We are currently offering a special on our bible study, Road to Resurrection, which helps the student to delve into the events which took place leading up to and on the Day of Resurrection.

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As we come into the week leading up to the celebration of the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ, I want to consider some of the hymns written about these events and what they mean for us.

In this hymn by the great hymn writer Charles Wesley–he was believed to have written over 6500 hymns–Wesley points out some of the incredible truths of the Resurrection. I love the line, “I woke–the dungeon flamed with light! My chains fell off, my heart was free, I rose, went forth, and followed Thee.” 

  1. And can it be that I should gain
    An int’rest in the Savior’s blood?
    Died He for me, who caused His pain—
    For me, who Him to death pursued?
    Amazing love! How can it be,
    That Thou, my God, shouldst die for me?

    • Refrain:
      Amazing love! How can it be,
      That Thou, my God, shouldst die for me?
  2. ’Tis myst’ry all: th’ Immortal dies:
    Who can explore His strange design?
    In vain the firstborn seraph tries
    To sound the depths of love divine.
    ’Tis mercy all! Let earth adore,
    Let angel minds inquire no more.
  3. He left His Father’s throne above—
    So free, so infinite His grace—
    Emptied Himself of all but love,
    And bled for Adam’s helpless race:
    ’Tis mercy all, immense and free,
    For, O my God, it found out me!
  4. Long my imprisoned spirit lay,
    Fast bound in sin and nature’s night;
    Thine eye diffused a quick’ning ray—
    I woke, the dungeon flamed with light;
    My chains fell off, my heart was free,
    I rose, went forth, and followed Thee.
  5. No condemnation now I dread;
    Jesus, and all in Him, is mine;
    Alive in Him, my living Head,
    And clothed in righteousness divine,
    Bold I approach th’ eternal throne,
    And claim the crown, through Christ my own.

Charles Wesley (1707-1788)

If you are looking for additional information and/or materials, please visit our website at RootedinHisWord.org and our Facebook page. We are currently offering a special on our bible study, Road to Resurrection, which helps the student to delve into the events which took place leading up to and on the Day of Resurrection.

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In His Arms - 7

 

I sang a praise chorus to myself quietly this morning…

Thy loving kindness is better than life

Thy loving kindness is better than life

My lips shall praise Thee–thus will I bless Thee

I will lift my hands up to thy name

A prayer rose up in my heart.

O Lord, my battered, broken heart remembers the security of your love.

I am a little bird and my beak is open, waiting for you to feed me.

I am fearful and afraid – and you are a great flood of power and majesty.  You are my King Jesus, riding on your white horse.  Sweeping beside me, you scoop me up in your gentle hands and place me safely behind you on the horse.  And ride away to safety.

I love You, Jesus, because you first loved me.  See how love gushes forth from my soul like a fountain – my grateful response to all that you are, to all that you have done for me!  To all that you are doing and are planning to do.

I lift my hands up…please take me with you!

    Copyright MaryBethMullin 2016

 

 

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One of my favorite Sundays of the year as a child was the first Sunday of Advent when we would sing this song:

o come o come

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This is definitely the time to count your blessings. It helps to have a song to sing along with as you do!

count-your-many-blessings

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